Remain Silent – Keb’ Mo’

John Henry Creach was born in 1917 and enjoyed a journeyman’s career as a jazz violinist, occasionally scoring a big gig with Louis Armstrong, Nat King Cole or Fats Waller, but more often scratching around, taking work where he could get it, including a five-year stint on an ocean liner. One night in 1967, already 50 years old but looking younger, Creach met future Jefferson Airplane drummer Joey Covington at Union Hall in San Francisco. When Covington joined the Airplane, he brought the newly rechristened Papa John Creach with him. Playing with Jefferson Airplane and Hot Tuna brought Creach a new hippie audience, and opened him (and them) up to an even wider range of music than he’d played before. Creach got his own record deal, and when he came to record his second album in 1974, Filthy Funky, his back-up band included a young guitarist called Kevin Moore.

In the 44 years since Moore and Creach first played together (a span of time that included stints as a writer-for-hire, an arranger, a stage and screen actor and a brief interlude as a recording artist under his given name), Keb’ Mo’ has released 12 studio albums, several more live albums and a collaborative record with Taj Mahal (called, perhaps inevitably, TajMo).

He began releasing records as Keb’ Mo’ in 1994, with a self-titled set based mainly on his impressive Robert Johnson-derived slide technique on National steel, with only the distinctly 1990s production (big fat snare drum, low-octave bass guitar of the sort we discussed in relation to Joni Mitchell’s cover of How Do You Stop) giving away the fact that these songs weren’t actually recorded in the 1920s. If Moore’s adoption of Johnson-esque suit and hat was a little gimmicky, his guitar playing and writing were the real deal.

From as early as his debut’s funk-informed take on Johnson’s Come On in My Kitchen, though, his music has explored territory outside country blues, and over the years he’s shown himself to be a very accomplished pop singer-songwriter. Remain Silent, from his 2006 album, Suitcase, is the sort of song Elvis Costello, Nick Lowe or even Paul Simon could have written, its extended Miranda-rights metaphor explored from all angles and delivered with just the right amount of knowingness in the vocal. Witness Mo’s little chuckle before declaring that “The punishment will fit the crime” and following that with the promise “One thing’s for sure: we’re gonna do some time”. His slide guitar is a welcome element in the mix, but it is only an element, less important than his mixed-forward vocal and no more important than the horns of Joe Sublett and Darrell Leonard or Jon Cleary’s B3 organ.

All of which is to say that if you’ve never explored Keb’ Mo’s music because you’re not a blues fan, you’re missing out on a lot of fine songs. And once you’re in his world, the true blues material might grow on you too.

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