Tag Archives: Rod Stewart

The Sound of Aimee Mann, part 3

The Forgotten Arm was sold to the public as that most prog of things, a concept album: a story in song about two lovers, Caroline and John (a boxer with a habit – Caroline is defined by her reactions to John rather than her own personality), who meet at a state fair and leave Virginia together, only to find that John’s problems are travelling with them.

While the narrative is present throughout all the album’s songs – Mann is too disciplined a writer to drop her concept halfway through – the music that supports the text is far from prog. For The Forgotten Arm, Mann hired a new (for her) cast of studio pros and had them play mid-’70s roots rock in the style of The Faces and Lynyrd Skynyrd (or in the album’s softer moments The Band and Tumbleweed Connection-era Elton John). For some of these players, this sort of meat-and-potatoes country rock was second nature; guitarist Jeff Trott, for example, who made his rep on Sheryl Crow’s second album. Others were slightly removed from their usual sphere; fellow guitarist Julian Coryell is more associated with jazz than cowboy-chord rock.

At times the wailing guitar crosses the line from authentically 1970s into schlock, with the worst excesses come from Trott. On She Really Wants You, he sounds like a wind machine is blowing his hair. His solo on Dear John, which is similar in style, tone and technique, is even more stadium; the vibrato is so foot-on-the-monitor over the top you wonder whether Trott could possibly be being serious.

The Forgotten Arm does have some really good songs*. I’ve gone into bat on this blog for That’s How I Knew this Story Would Break My Heart, and I’m fond too of King of the Jailhouse, She Really Wants You, Going Through the Motions and I Can’t Get My Head Around It. Joe Henry’s production is, for the most part, spare and unobtrusive (that said, the wide-panned mixes of King of the Jailhouse and Going Through the Motions are love-it-or-hate-it stuff), and while the mastering is loud, the lack of steady-state noise in the arrangements means the songs mostly emerge unscathed, if a little misshapen. All in all, though, this is the least Aimee Mann-like album in her discography sonically, and while I can imagine Mann non-fans enjoying it, I doubt many of them got to hear it.

Many artists, when they have been making records long enough, reach a point where each new album is a reaction to the one before it, and much effort is expended in trying to correct the things that the artist didn’t like about the last one.

@#%&*! Smilers does not feature any electric guitar.

But that’s a story for another day. In the meantime, I’ll let you make of that what you will.

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Aimee Mann circa The Forgotten Arm

*On my way home I listened to the first couple of songs on The Forgotten Arm and what struck me was that while their verses and choruses are built – as the majority of Mann’s songs are – on repeating four-chord patterns over which Mann sings attractive but narrow-ranging melodies, the middle eights have chord sequences that seem to have been driven by the movement of the melody, giving the chorus more focus and punch when it comes back round.

In my own songwriting, I’ve usually felt that the strongest songs I’ve written have come when the melodies and the chords have either come to me at the same time as each other, or I can hear where I want the tune to go and have to work out what chords work best to support that movement. I’ve written decent songs when I’ve fitted a tune to a predetermined chord sequence (or riff that implied chord changes), but I’ve always felt that writing that way was essentially what rock bands do, and writing from the melody downwards was how “proper” composers write. Horribly snobbish, I know, but old prejudices die hard.

Anyhow, my hunch is that this aspect of Mann’s writing died away after The Forgotten Arm. I’ll look into this and see if it’s true. Yep, listening to songs while counting chord changes. The things I do… For now, it’s more of a side note, as the series of posts is more about engineering, mixing and arrangement than songwriting per se.

Communication – The Cardigans

Some songs don’t make sense as fan favourites only. They feel like they should belong to, be known and loved by, the widest possible audience. Probably every music fan has a list of songs like that.*

It’s one thing when such a song is by a band of indie heroes whose music is scruffy and raw, and would need to be significantly polished up to become acceptable to the mainstream. However good they are, there’s a reason why Turn On the News is known only to Husker Du fans and Unsatisfied only to Replacements fans, but even my dad would recognise Soul Asylum’s Runaway Train were Ken Bruce to play it tomorrow. There’s a reason why Rod Stewart’s readings of I Don’t Want to Talk About It and Downtown Train were hits but the Crazy Horse and Tom Waits originals weren’t. But I can’t really understand how Communication by the Cardigans wasn’t a huge hit.

The Cardigans’ discography is spottiness incarnate. Lovefool is enduringly perfect (it’s the bassline. Dear lord, that bassline); My Favourite Game is enduringly regrettable. Every album has some great moments (even Gran Turismo had Erase/Rewind), but all of their albums have clunkers and a bulk of material that’s neither really here nor there.

But Communication – from 2003’s Long Gone Before Daylight – is different. Communication wasn’t the typical indie-with-strings ballady thing you got from a lot of that era’s bands, and neither was it particularly rootsy, although much of Long Gone Before Daylight was – the drums, for example, sound 2003 (clipped and somewhat like samples), not 1973.

The record is beautifully arranged. The band are cast in supporting textural roles, other than guitarist and principle songwriter Peter Svensson, whose prominent riff features in the intro, after the first chorus and in the outro, and who gets to play rather a nice harmonised solo**. Other than that, the most notable performance by a band member is Bengt Lagerberg’s drumming, which has nice Bonham-inflected kick drum work (the influence of Bonham’s Kashmir beat is evident in those semi-quavers), but isn’t in the least bit bombastic. He could have turned this song into a power ballad but wisely chose not to, playing with Hot Rods for a smaller sound. The band merely provide the frame for Patrik Bartosch’s string arrangement – only really getting big and prominent in the final chorus, but otherwise nicely supportive to the mood and atmosphere of the song – and Persson’s vocal.

Which is where a song like Communication succeeds or fails. Her voice pushed to the very front of the mix and left relatively dry and exposed, Persson sings Communication like it’s the most important thing she’s ever had to say, and her performance is moving and feels very true. It’s what gets her over a couple of slightly awkward lines (whatever they may mean to us, Persson’s delivery insists that her words are meaningful to her), and gives such force when the band plays its two huge arrangemental aces: the triplet downbeats of “I’m talking and talking” in the final chorus and that magical moment when Persson sings “And I hold a record for being patient” while drummer Lagerberg plays the song’s most live-sounding fill and the song seems suspended in mid-air for a second until the rest of the band comes back in.
It’s a glorious moment. It’s a big moment, in some ways too big for a song that no one really heard when it came out.

Songs have long lives these days, and can return to the charts or enter them for the first time decades after release, were they suddenly to find mass relevance. Maybe some music supervisor will use Communication to score a particularly emotional scene in a TV show or film and the song will find the wider audience it’s not had up to now. Until then it remains, I suspect, treasured by the band’s deep fans.

Cardigans

*I’ll give you some of mine: Jellyfish’s The King is Half-Undressed, Big Star’s The Ballad of El Goodo, Sparklehorse’s Some Day I Will Treat You Good, No Need to Worry by the Folk Implosion

**Svensson has a profitable sideline these days as a writer, guitarist and producer for hire. Look for him among the credits on records by The Weeknd, Ariana Grande and Ellie Goulding.

Crying, Laughing, Loving, Lying – Labi Siffre

I first head Crying, Laughing, Loving, Lying in a BBC documentary about motor racing called Grand Prix: The Killer Years.

If that sounds like a melodramatic title, it’s worth watching the programme, which was a good deal more sober (it seems to have disappeared off YouTube at the moment though). One scene, once viewed, is unforgettable.

During the 1973 Dutch Grand Prix at Zandvoort, Roger Williamson’s tyre blew. His car somersaulted, landed upside and caught fire. The driver behind him, David Purley, pulled over, tried on his own to roll the car over and, not being able to, looked in vain for assistance. He grabbed a fire extinguisher out of a marshal’s hand and tried to put out the fire himself. As the fire worsened, he pleaded with the assembled marshals (four or five of them) to help him try to roll the car over. Wearing no protective flame-retardant clothing, they declined to help (one half-heartedly stood directly behind Purley and pushed into his back). Williamson’s car was still burning, with still no sign of ambulances or fire engines. While the race continued, Purley signalled in frustration for the drivers to stop. Still Williamson’s car burned. By this time, Williamson was almost certainly dead.

So the film was harrowing (at times, in fact, it’s hard to believe that what you’re seeing happened, and was in fact broadcast as Sunday afternoon entertainment), and few who were not themselves former drivers emerged from it with any credit. The footage of Williamson’s fatal accident was allowed by the production team to play with no overdubbed music. You hear the engines of the cars as they go past, and occasionally you hear Purley’s remonstrations with the officials, but the gravity of the moment is not cheapened by added music.

Elswhere in the programme, though, they did make use of music, and good use of it too. One song, playing underneath reaction to (I think) the death of Jim Clark, was unknown to me, but beautiful, so I googled the lyrics and found out that it was Crying, Laughing, Loving, Lying by Labi Siffre, from 1972.

Nowadays best remembered for the anti-apartheid song Something Inside So Strong, It Must Be Love (most associated with Madness) and I Got The… (the deathless groove of its second half is the sampled backbone of Eminem’s My Name Is), Siffre’s career stretches back to the early 1960s, when he played guitar in a Jimmy Smith-style jazz group. He found mainstream success in the early 1970s, presumably with the same kind of audience as that of Cat Stevens, to whose music Siffre’s sometimes bears a passing resemblance. He went to the same West London Catholic school, St Benedict’s, as my uncles (and Julian Clarey); “God is the last refuge of a scoundrel” reads the latest blog entry on Siffre’s website – a Catholic education so often seems to have the opposite of its intended effect.

Crying, Laughing, Loving, Lying (also the title of its parent album) is one of those simple, elemental songs that feel as if they must always have existed. It’s just some nimble guitar picking, the same melodic phrases repeated four times, with small variations in the words, and a slowly, subtly building arrangement. Such musical and lyrical economy but such an emotional effect. Siffre makes something very difficult sound very easy here. Rod Stewart, Olivia Newton John and Jimmy Ruffin have all covered it; none could resist the temptation to make it bigger (surprisingly, the loathsome Stewart fares the best). Even so, Siffre’s version is the essential one.

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Labi Siffre