Tag Archives: Travis

She Said – Longpigs

In my office, the nineties never ended. The radio’s on almost all of the time. Most of the time it’s tuned to a certain station that plays mainly rock music from the last twenty-five years, with a sprinkling of other, non-rock, things, which always sound very strange by comparison – Frankie Goes to Hollywood’s Relax sounds positively avant-garde in the context of endless Stereophonics and U2 and Kings of Leon.

Most of this rock music is, in the end, polite. Even the fiercer-sounding bands (Nirvana, say) are somewhat neutered in this context; the huge wall of guitars of the majority of nineties rock being less likely to jump out of the speakers as something spindly and angular, the music ends up sounding somewhat samey.

But now and again a song does poke its head up and demand to be heard by virtue of sounding different. Such a song, which I’ve only heard a couple of times on this station since starting in this job four months ago but which has been a delight on each occasion, is She Said by the Longpigs.

The ambition held by Longpigs frontman Crispin Hunt in 1996, it seemed, was to have a band that sounded as much as possible like Radiohead, with whom the Longpigs toured in 1995. In the context of their later work, Radiohead’s The Bends sounds like a conventional mid-nineties rock record, but it’s worth remembering that no one else at the time was ploughing quite the same furrow as them. Yes, you could hear debts to R.E.M., to U2, to Nirvana, to Jeff Buckley, and going back further, to Magazine* and to David Bowie, but it added up to a sound that was the band’s own, which is why it was notable how much the Longpigs’ sound owed to The Bends. Vocals that jumped suddenly up an octave? Yep. Squalling, trebly Fenders? A general sense of over-caffeinated nerviness? Songs that were anthemic, bombastic and over the top, but still managed to sound genuine and personal? Yep, yep and yep.

But despite being somewhat derivative, Longpigs made a couple of great records in their short career, and She Said is the pick of them. What’s so great about it is its lack of restraint. Hunt, sounding more than a little unhinged,  yelps and screams his way through the song while the band clatter along behind him, drummer Dee Boyle’s performance being particularly inspired. I love his playing during the bridge, just before the stop, and in the last chorus and coda – it’s not showy, it’s not spectacular, but he sounds fully inside the song and he sounds like he’s having a lot of fun. With the success of Travis and Coldplay, this kind of messy abandon would disappear from British indie rock within a few years.

The second Longpigs album flopped, and flopped hard. Nothing more was heard of them as a band. But the cultural reach of the band’s members is surprisingly long. Of course, the most famous former Longpig is guitarist Richard Hawley, who went on to a spell in Pulp (replacing Russell Senior), before releasing records under his own name, which are pleasant, if sometimes in need of a dose of whatever Crispin Hunt was taking in 1996. Bass player Simon Stafford has played with Joe Strummer and Jarvis Cocker. But Hunt has perhaps the most intriguing post-Longpigs story: he’s now a behind-the-scenes guy, co-writing with or producing Jake Bugg, Florence + the Machine, Newton Faulkner, Cee-Lo Green, Ellie Goulding, Natalie Imbruglia, Fighting with Wire, Ron Sexsmith, even Mark Owen.

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*Longpigs could, however, claim their own post-punk influences that didn’t come through Radiohead: drummer Dee Boyle was a former member of Cabaret Voltaire

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No one knows – Olivier Libaux, featuring Inara George

I should hate this. Easy listening covers of hard rock songs. Hard rock covers of dance songs. Dance covers of jazz standards. Urrgh. Any sense of joy and discovery and emotional connection gets flattened by the concept, by the unspoken attitude behind the project, which is always one of three mindsets: Look how good this music would be if it adhered to our aesthetic norms (the impulse behind Travis’s Britney cover and Alien Ant Farm’s Smooth Criminal); Look how clever I am, that I can take a song in that style and play it in this style (the impulse behind this); or Look at me and my funny arrangements of pop songs (Richard Cheese and so on).

When the Queens of the Stone Age started, they derived their effect from playing repetitive riffs at punishing volume (and I do mean punishing – no other gig I’ve seen has come close to the eardrum-shattering, stomach-churning volume of QOTSA back in 2001, although I’ve never seen MBV or Dinosaur Jr), creating a sort of heavy metal version of Kraftwerk – robot rock, as Josh Homme called it.

But even by the time of second album Rated R, they were moving away from that. It became clear to Homme, I think, that the band’s real power lay in the distance between the aggression of the music and his calm, clean, disconnected-sounding vocals. Homme doesn’t shout hoarsely and passionately. He sings calmly, in rather a high-pitched voice, while the band around him batter their instruments senseless. That tension lies at the heart of all their great early songs: Regular John, Mexicola, The Lost Art of Keeping a Secret, Better Living Through Chemistry, In the Fade (although Lanegan is Homme’s proxy on that one) and No One Knows. During Nick Oliveri’s time with the band, his gonzo vocal performances were effective because of their contrast with Homme’s reigned-in style; without Homme’s blankness to play off, they’d have simply been ludicrous (and as it is they’re still pretty silly).

There’s no need to remake a QOTSA record where the music sounds as disconnected, as lifeless, as the vocal. Or, if you are going to make elevator-music backing tracks, get powerful, sweaty voices to sing the songs. Get, I don’t know, Tina Turner or someone, to stamp and bellow her way through them. Get Tom Jones to come over and roar the songs like an enraged Old Testament prophet.

And yet… I like this. I shouldn’t. On paper it shouldn’t work. I shouldn’t just dislike it; I should hate it. This sort of thing never works as real music. And yet it, on this occasion, it does. Olivier Libaux, the French songwriter behind Les Objets Bain and Nouvelle Vague (who have done the same in the past to the Talking Heads), has made a full record of this stuff, with a parade of guest singers: the Bird & the Bee singer Inara George (daughter of Lowell George from Little Feat) on No One Knows, plus Susan Dillane from Woodbine, Ambrosia Parsley from Shivaree, Skye from Morcheeba and so on. Since all the singers give similar performances, with no real outliers in tone or approach, there’s more than a whiff of markets being targeted; get a guest singer and you can sell your record to that singer’s fanbase; get 10 guest singers… There’s more than a whiff of cynicism about the whole enterprise, and still I can’t bring myself to hate the damn thing.

It’s a strange feeling to like a record that seems to have been designed specifically to annoy you. Yet here it is, and while I’m certain I couldn’t stand a whole album of it, I do like it. I’d tell you why, but I honestly can’t.

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Inara George and Josh Homme – They don’t know. I don’t know. I guess no one knows